ENO: La traviata

 

Giuseppe Verdi (1813-1901)
Conductor, Leo McFall / Toby Purser (11 April)
Director, Daniel Kramer

Daniel Kramer directs his first opera as ENO Artistic Director, a sweepingly romantic interpretation of La traviata

Daniel Kramer will direct his first opera as English National Opera’s Artistic Director this spring. This production of La traviata, which played to sold-out houses following its premiere at Theater Basel, is a sweepingly romantic take on one of opera’s most heartbreaking stories. Irish soprano Claudia Boyle will perform the role of Violetta alongside South African singer Lukhanyo Moyake as Alfredo. Singing the role of Giorgio Germont is Alan Opie, who celebrates 50 years since he first sang with ENO.

Daniel Kramer said: ‘Almost every note of Verdi’s masterpiece raises up the life of a women who has been deemed dishonourable by society. Through La traviata, Verdi invites us to listen to the magnanimous love of a character who makes a sacrifice which few others would be willing or able to consider. His music is, for me, a love letter to the tender and graceful Violetta. I believe that our core audience come to ENO wanting to have new light shed upon these well-loved classics. This is also one of my key passions when directing opera or theatre, and has informed our approach to this intensely moving story of love and sacrifice.  As our world continues to confront the treatment of women in our society we have worked to share the story of a woman who, despite her heartbreaking circumstances, rises above the judgmental and abusive world around her and passes through her life with integrity and grace.’  

Daniel Kramer was appointed Artistic Director of English National Opera in April 2016, taking up the position in August that year. His work with ENO extends backs to 2008. He was selected as part of ENO’s young director’s initiative for which he directed Punch and Judy at the Young Vic which subsequently won the South Bank Show Award for Outstanding Achievement in Opera. Daniel returned to ENO in 2009 to direct Bartok’s Duke Bluebeard’s Castle at the London Coliseum and Wagner’s Tristan and Isolde, conducted by former ENO Music Director Edward Gardner and designed by Anish Kapoor. He has been an Associate at the Gate Theatre, Notting Hill and the Young Vic, and a Creative Associate at the Royal Shakespeare Company. The 18/19 season, launched on the 1 May, will be the first that he has curated as ENO Artistic Director.

The ephemeral, image-conscious world of the courtesan Violetta will be brought to life through the designs of Lizzie Clachan, one of the most acclaimed set designers currently working in London theatre. She has recently been praised for her ‘extraordinary’ (The Guardian) work on the Young Vic’s Yerma, and for the National Theatre’s As You Like It.

Irish soprano Claudia Boyle will sing Violetta, the eponymous ‘fallen woman’. A fomer member of the Salzburger Festpiel’s Young Singers Project, her international profile has been dramatically raised through highly-acclaimed performances in London, Berlin, Rome and New York. For ENO Claudia has previously sung the roles of Leïla in The Pearl Fishers(2016) and a ‘standout’ (The Guardian) Mabel in The Pirates of Penzance (2015).

Up-and-coming South African tenor Lukhanyo Moyake makes his UK debut as Alfredo. South Africa’s representative in 2017’s BBC Cardiff Singer of the World, Lukhanyo has been performing at the Cape Town Opera Company since his graduation in 2010. His roles there include Alfredo in La traviata, Jaquino in Fidelio and Tom Rakewell in The Rake’s Progress. In 2015 and 2016 he was a finalist of the International Hans Gabor Belvedere Singing Competition (held in Amsterdam) and was also placed third in the Neue Stimmen International Singing Competition (held in Germany).

ENO legend and internationally acclaimed baritone Alan Opie will return for his second ENO engagement of the season. He follows his debut in the comic role of Doctor Bartolo (The Barber of Seville) with Violetta’s controlling father, Giorgio Germont. Alan’s previous performances in this role have been described as ‘full of feeling’ (The Guardian) and ‘consistently compelling’ (WhatsOnStage).

A nominee for Best Male Singer in the 2018 International Opera Awards, bass-baritone Henry Waddington will sing Dr Grenvil. Welsh tenor Aled Hall makes his ENO debut as Viscount Gaston and ENO Harewood Artist Božidar Smiljani? sings the Marquis. The cast is completed by Benjamin Bevan (Baron Douphol), Heather Shipp (Flora Bervoix) andMartha Jones (Annina).

Rising young British conductor Leo McFall will make his ENO debut with this production. Winner of the 2015 German Conductor’s Prize, he is among the foremost conductors of his generation, and received much praise for his performances with the Glyndebourne Tour and with Opera North. He will be assisted by ENO Mackerras Fellow Toby Purser, who will also conduct the performance on the 11 April.

The creative team is completed by Cosume Designer Esther Bialas, Lighting Designer Charles Balfour and Choreographer Teresa Rotemberg.

La traviata opens on Friday 16 March at 7.30pm at the London Coliseum for 10 performances: 16, 22, 24, 28 March and 3, 5, 11, 13 April at 7.30pm, 31 March at 6.30pm and 8 April at 3pm.

500 tickets for £20 or less are available for each performance. Tickets start from £12.

Brighton Philharmonic Orchestra

Regular guest conductor Stephen Bell joins the Brighton Phil for their penultimate Sunday afternoon concert of the season at Brighton Dome and introduces the programme:

“Hugely powerful Russian emotions in our next concert ranging from an overture by the grand old man of Russian Romantics to one of the first examples of programme music with the brilliantly orchestrated Night on a Bare Mountain. The ever popular Fourth Symphony by Tchaikovsky is a vivid journey in itself, from the tense opening motif from the horns and bassoons, right through to the unbridled joy of the F major final pages.

In between, we’re joined by my long-time Hallé colleague and London Brass member, the award winning trumpeter Gareth Small, for a performance of the Arutunian Trumpet Concerto – a perfect vehicle to show off the technical and lyrical qualities of the instrument in a work that seems to draw on many strands of Russian influences and is a perfectly crafted and brilliant showpiece.”

Gareth Small, Principal Trumpet of the Hallé Orchestra, wants to reassure those unfamiliar with Armenian composer Alexander Arutunian’s show-stopping Trumpet Concerto (written in 1950) that they are in for a treat:

“I’m delighted to be back in Brighton Dome to play the Arutunian Trumpet Concerto. Don’t be put off if you haven’t heard of the composer. This magnificent piece is fizzing with interesting harmonies, timbres, melodies and textures, for orchestra and soloist which all come together to create this absolutely brilliant trumpet concerto. It is certainly one of my favourites as it highlights and accentuates the best parts of trumpet playing – range, stamina, technical prowess and tone. I hope you enjoy this piece as much as I do!”

The programme also includes Glinka’s characteristically Russian sounding overture from A Life for the Tsar which displays the heroic nobility suggested by the opera’s story of a young Russian peasant who saves the Tsar from a group of Polish kidnappers. More familiar to many will be Mussorgsky’s demonic tone poem Night on a Bare Mountain which depicts a witches’ Sabbath in music of quite terrifying power and energy (and was used in the penultimate scene of Walt Disney’s Fantasia).

Tickets from £12-£38 (50% discount for students/Under 18s) are available from Brighton Dome Ticket Office in Church Street, (01273) 709709 and online: www.brightondome.org

The Brighton Phil’s season finale will take place on Sunday 25 March when Conductor Laureate Barry Wordsworth returns to celebrate his 70th birthday with the orchestra, joined by virtuosic piano duo Worbey & Farrell who will perform Carnival of the Animals. That morning sees the popular FREE Open Rehearsal for Children (10.15-11am) for which places can be booked via Brighton Dome Ticket Office.

 

 

 

ENO: La traviata

Daniel Kramer directs his first opera as ENO Artistic Director, a sweepingly romantic interpretation of La traviata

Opens Friday 16 March at 7.30pm at the London Coliseum (10 performances)

Daniel Kramer will direct his first opera as English National Opera’s Artistic Director this spring. This production of La traviata, which played to sold-out houses following its premiere at Theater Basel, is a sweepingly romantic take on one of opera’s most heartbreaking stories. Irish soprano Claudia Boyle will perform the role of Violetta alongside South African tenor Lukhanyo Moyake as Alfredo. Singing the role of Giorgio Germont is Alan Opie, who celebrates 50 years since he first sang with ENO.

Daniel Kramer said:

‘Almost every note of Verdi’s masterpiece raises up the life of a women who has been deemed dishonourable by society. Through La traviata, Verdi invites us to listen to the magnanimous love of a character who makes a sacrifice which few others would be willing or able to consider. His music is, for me, a love letter to the tender and graceful Violetta.

I believe that our core audience come to ENO wanting to have new light shed upon these well-loved classics. This is also one of my key passions when directing opera or theatre, and has informed our approach to this intensely moving story of love and sacrifice.  

As our world continues to confront the treatment of women in our society we have worked to share the story of a woman who, despite her heartbreaking circumstances, rises above the judgmental and abusive world around her and passes through her life with integrity and grace.’  

Daniel Kramer was appointed Artistic Director of English National Opera in April 2016, taking up the position in August that year. His work with ENO extends backs to 2008. He was selected as part of ENO’s young director’s initiative for which he directed Punch and Judy at the Young Vic which subsequently won the South Bank Show Award for Outstanding Achievement in Opera. Daniel returned to ENO in 2009 to direct Bartok’s Duke Bluebeard’s Castle at the London Coliseum and Wagner’s Tristan and Isolde, conducted by former ENO Music Director Edward Gardner and designed by Anish Kapoor. He has been an Associate at the Gate Theatre, Notting Hill and the Young Vic, and a Creative Associate at the Royal Shakespeare Company. The 18/19 season, launched on the 1 May, will be the first that he has curated as ENO Artistic Director.

The ephemeral, image-conscious world of the courtesan Violetta will be brought to life through the designs of Lizzie Clachan, one of the most acclaimed set designers currently working in London theatre. She has recently been praised for her ‘extraordinary’ (The Guardian) work on the Young Vic’s Yerma, and for the National Theatre’s As You Like It.

Claudia Boyle will sing Violetta, the eponymous ‘fallen woman’. A fomer member of the Salzburger Festpiel’s Young Singers Project, her international profile has been dramatically raised through highly-acclaimed performances in London, Berlin, Rome and New York. For ENO Claudia has previously sung the roles of Leïla in The Pearl Fishers (2016) and a ‘standout’ (The Guardian) Mabel in The Pirates of Penzance (2015).

Up-and-coming tenor Lukhanyo Moyake makes his UK debut as Alfredo. South Africa’s representative in 2017’s BBC Cardiff Singer of the World, Lukhanyo has been performing at the Cape Town Opera Company since his graduation in 2010. His roles there include Alfredo in La traviata, Jaquino in Fidelio and Tom Rakewell in The Rake’s Progress. In 2015 and 2016 he was a finalist of the International Hans Gabor Belvedere Singing Competition (held in Amsterdam) and was also placed third in the Neue Stimmen International Singing Competition (held in Germany).

ENO legend and internationally acclaimed baritone Alan Opie will return for his second ENO engagement of the season. He follows his debut in the comic role of Doctor Bartolo (The Barber of Seville) with Violetta’s controlling father, Giorgio Germont. Alan’s previous performances in this role have been described as ‘full of feeling’ (The Guardian) and ‘consistently compelling’ (WhatsOnStage).

Rising young British conductor Leo McFall will make his ENO debut with this production. Winner of the 2015 German Conductor’s Prize, he is among the foremost conductors of his generation, and received much praise for his performances with the Glyndebourne Tour and with Opera North. He will be assisted by ENO Mackerras Conducting Fellow Toby Purser, who will also conduct the performance on the 11 April.

La traviata opens on Friday 16 March at 7.30pm at the London Coliseum for 10 performances: 16, 22, 24, 28 March and 3, 5, 11, 13 April at 7.30pm, 31 March at 6.30pm and 8 April at 3pm.

500 tickets for £20 or less are available for each performance. Tickets start from £12.

A co-production with Theater Basel

 

English National Opera announces cast for ENO Studio Live 2018 and three new Harewood Artists

English National Opera (ENO) is delighted to announce the casts for Acis and Galatea and Paul Bunyan, 2018’s two ENO Studio Live productions. ENO Studio Live forms part of ENO Outside which takes ENO’s work to arts-engaged audiences that may not have considered opera before, presenting the immense power of opera in more intimate studio and theatre environments.

Acis and Galatea will take place at ENO’s historic rehearsal studios, Lilian Baylis House. Paul Bunyan will be ENO’s first collaboration with Wilton’s Music Hall. Both pieces are being performed by ENO for the very first time and celebrate the integral roles that Handel and Britten have played in the company’s history.

We are also thrilled to share that exceptional young singers Rowan PierceAlex Otterburn and William Morgan will become ENO Harewood Artists with immediate effect. The ENO Harewood Artist programme was established in 1998 as a means of providing a full-time training and performance scheme for exceptionally talented singers at the beginning of their careers. They will join current ENO Harewood Artists Andri Björn RóbertssonKatie CoventryEleanor DennisMatthew DurkanDavid IrelandRhian LoisElgan Llyr ThomasSoraya MafiSamantha PriceBožidar Smiljani?Katie Stevenson and David Webb.

Acis and Galatea (six performances, 9-16 June 2018, Lilian Baylis House)
George Frideric Handel
John Gay

Directed by Sarah Tipple, designed by Justin Nardella and conducted by Nicholas Ansdell EvansAcis and Galatea features four exciting young British singers. Tenor Alexander Sprague and soprano Lucy Hall sing the title roles. ENO Harewood Artist Matthew Durkan sings the role of Polyphemus and Bradley Smithmakes his ENO debut as Damon.

Acis – Alexander Sprague

Galatea – Lucy Hall

Polyphemus – Matthew Durkan

Damon – Bradley Smith

Paul Bunyan (six performances, 3-8 September, Wilton’s Music Hall)
Benjamin Britten
W. H. Auden

Directed by Jamie Manton, designed by Camilla Clarke and conducted by Matthew Kofi WaldrenPaul Bunyan will be a celebration of ENO’s exceptional emerging and in-house talent. Roles will be sung by ENO Harewood Artists (Elgan Llyr ThomasRowan PierceWilliam Morgan) and members of ENO’s award-winning Chorus.

Johnny Inkslinger – Elgan Llyr Thomas

Tiny – Rowan Pierce

Hot Biscuit Slim – William Morgan

Fido – Claire Pendleton

Moppett – Ella Kirkpatrick

Poppett – Lydia Marchione

Sam Sharkey – Graeme Lauren

Ben Benny – Trevor Bowes

Andy Anderson / Cronie – Adam Sullivan

Pete Peterson / Cronie – Geraint Hylton

Jen Jenson / Cronie – Paul Sheehan

Cross Crosshaulson / Cronie – Andrew Tinkler

John Shears – Robert Winslade Anderson

Western Union Boy – David Newman

Quartet of the Defeated – Michael Burke, Morag Boyle, David Newman, Paul Sheehan

Solo Lumberjacks – Paul Sheehan, Ronald Nairne and Pablo Strong

Wild Geese – Claire Mitcher, Rebecca Stockland, Susanna Tudor-Thomas

Young Trees – Joanne Appleby, Amy Sedgwick, Pablo Strong

 

 

Alexandra Dariescu

Romanian pianist Alexandra Dariescu joins the European Young Leaders’ programme class of 2018, organised under the patronage of Jean-Claude Juncker, President of the European Commission

Romanian pianist Alexandra Dariescu joins the European Young Leaders (EYL40) programme class of 2018, organised under the patronage of Jean-Claude Juncker, President of the European Commission. Led by Friends of Europe, EYL40 is a unique, inventive and multi-stakeholder programme that aims to promote a European identity by engaging the continent’s most promising talents that will shape Europe’s future.

Based on the premise that a group of talented leaders from different backgrounds, sectors and European countries can offer new responses to international challenges, it brings together established professionals under the age of 40 who have made their mark in a wide range of fields such as politics, science, business, media NGOs, the arts and civil society. Those selected to participate are creative, committed to changing the world, and have demonstrated potential to reach the highest levels of their chosen profession.

As part of the programme, Dariescu joins other members of the Class of 2018 and alumni for two European seminars, encouraging ‘out-of-the-box’ thinking in open, constructive discussions: from 8-10 March in Warsaw and 13-15 September 2018 (location to be announced).

Alexandra Dariescu said: ‘I am thrilled and humbled to be part of the European Young Leaders (EYL40) and feel very privileged to join such an incredible group of leaders from all over Europe. I hope through the discussions and fantastic activities programme in Warsaw we will be able to identify solutions in creating a more unified, perceptive and prosperous Europe.’

Dariescu also participates in the Guildhall School of Music & Drama’s fifth international Reflective Conservatoire Conference Tuesday 20-Friday 23 February 2018: this year’s theme is ‘Artists as Citizens.’ She sits on Vice-Principal & Director of Guildhall Innovation Professor Helena Gaunt’s welcome panel on the opening day, and, as an alumna of their Creative Entrepreneurs scheme, joins others from the course in discussing their work and professional trajectory before performing at the end of the session.

Dariescu has also been selected to present her project The Nutcracker and I, by Alexandra Dariescu at the Classical:NEXT conference, held in Rotterdam on 16-19 May 2019, as part of their annual Project Pitches initiative. Each of the 14 participants have nine minutes to present and answer questions in front of leading and influential members of the music industry, allowing an insight into the most intriguing and innovative developments in the sector.

She wants to challenge the traditional concert format and reach out to new audiences who might not have considered coming to a classical concert before. She has devised a ground-breaking 50-minute live multi-media performance piece for piano soloist, ballerina and digital animation.

Dariescu has created her own personal take on this much-loved story which sees herself re-imagined as Clara: from little girl dreaming to concert pianist. On stage is a grand piano, played by Dariescu herself, and a ballerina behind a see-through gauze screen. Projected onto the gauze and bringing the story to life are exquisite digital animations, all hand drawn and created in advance by Yeast Culture. They follow the music and engage live with the pianist and ballerina as they ‘dance’ across the screen. The audience feel like they are actually in and a part of the Nutcracker story.

Tchaikovsky’s beloved ballet music features throughout and includes favourites such as Dance of the Sugar Plum Fairy, Arabian Dance, Chinese Dance, Pas de Deux, and the Flower Waltz in 15 virtuosic arrangements by Mikhail PletnevStepan EsipoffPercy Grainger and three brand new variations by Gavin Sutherland.

Having received its world premiere on 19 December 2017 on the Guildhall School’s Alumni Recital Series at Milton Court, it is also being released as a special book and CD on Signum Records and will include all 15 piano transcriptions with narration by Lindsey Russell, story by Jessica Duchen, artwork created by YeastCulture and illustrated by Adam Smith.

For complete listings for Alexandra’s schedule, please visit http://alexandradariescu.com/ or Alexandra’s general management Konzertdirektion Schmid http://kdschmid.de/artistdetail/items/alexandra-dariescu.html.

ENO: A Midsummer Night’s Dream

Robert Carsen’s classic production of A Midsummer Night’s Dream returns to the London Coliseum

Opens Thursday 01 March at 7.30pm at the London Coliseum (6 performances)

Robert Carsen’s ‘legendary production’ (Bachtrack) of Benjamin Britten’s Shakespearean comedy returns to the London Coliseum this spring, featuring an ensemble of some of British opera’s most sparkling rising stars.

The production is the first of four works by Benjamin Britten to be performed in this fiftieth anniversary year of opera in residence at the Coliseum and highlights the historic role of the company in premiering and performing the composer’s work.  The Turn of the Screw  at Regent’s Park Open Air Theatre and  Paul Bunyan at Wilton’s Music Hall follow later this season, finishing with a staged interpretation of Britten’s  War Requiem  in November.

Shakespeare’s romantic comedy, with its two pairs of lovers enchanted, switched and finally given their happy ending by fairy magic, is beautifully retold in Britten’s opera. Carsen’s bewitching nocturnal staging, with Michael Levine’s arresting dreamscape designs and Matthew Bourne’s gorgeously fluid choreography, has enchanted audiences from La Scala to Beijing since its 1991 premiere at the Aix-en-Provence Festival. This is its third revival at the London Coliseum, where it last appeared in 2004.

Shakespeare’s hapless and hilarious cast of fairies, lovers and mechanicals are given life by a group of singers closely associated with ENO, including five Harewood Artists, members of ENO’s scheme for the training of talented young singers. Harewood Artist and winner of the 2016 Susan Chilcott Award Soraya Mafi sings fairy queen Tytania in her role debut, after her ‘scintillating’(The Daily Telegraph)performance as Mabel in 2017’s revival of  The Pirates of Penzance. She is joined by countertenor Christopher Ainslie as her husband Oberon; the two also sang together in October 2017 as Cleopatra and Cesare in ETO’s  Giulio Cesare. In 2014 Ainslie performed in Thebans with his most recent appearance being a ‘breathtaking’ ( The Guardian )performance in Rodelinda.

Harewood Artist David Webb returns for his second engagement of the season as the young lover Demetrius following his Messenger in  Aida . His Frederic in  The Pirates of Penzance  opposite Mafi was praised for its ‘effortless vocal lyricism’ ( What’s On Stage)and considerable comic ability. Fellow Harewood Artist Matthew Durkan sings his rival Lysander in his third appearance of the season, following Fiorello in The Barber of Seville and Malcolm Fleet in the world premiere of Marnie .

Lysander’s lover Hermia is sung by mezzo-soprano Clare Presland, who has appeared in many roles at ENO since training with Opera Works, in shows which include  Lulu, The Force of Destiny and Lady Macbeth of Mtsensk. She is the winner of the 2014 Susan Chilcott Award. Her rival Helena is sung by Harewood Artist Eleanor Dennis, whose role as the High Priestess earlier in the season in Aida  gained wide attention: ‘she is a major talent’ (What’s On Stage).

Bottom is sung by bass Joshua Bloom, whose comic chops were demonstrated by his swaggering Pirate King in the 2015 run of  The Pirates of Penzance . The non-singing role of Puck is performed by  Miltos Yerolemou, who has performed the role in Carsen’s production since 2008: ‘has it all: a scorching twinkle in his eye, the richest of speaking voices and fearless tumbling skills’ ( Bachtrack ). Yerelemou is known to television audiences as  Game of Thrones’  Syrio Forel.

Theseus is sung by ENO Harewood Artist Andri Björn Róbertsson and his bride Hippolyta by Emma Carrington. The band of Mechanicals, Quince, Flute, Snug, Snout and Starveling, are sung by familiar ENO faces Graeme Danby, Robert Murray, Jonathan Lemalu, Timothy Robinson and Simon Butteriss respectively.

Making his debut conducting the ENO Orchestra is Alexander Soddy, Music Director at the National Theatre at Mannheim since 2016. Having spent the last decade with orchestras in Germany and Austria, the English conductor has been a guest conductor at the Hamburg and Berlin State Operas as well as the State Theatre at Klagenfurt where as Music Director he last conducted  A Midsummer Night’s Dream in 2015.

The Canadian Robert Carsen is one of the most prominent and influential international directors of opera of the last thirty years, originator of numerous acclaimed productions and recipient of the Order of Canada. Revival direction is by Emmanuelle Bastet, longtime collaborator of Carsen’s and revival director for the previous run of performances at the London Coliseum in 2004.

Matthew Bourne is one of the most important figures in contemporary choreography, whose work includes seminal interpretations of  Swan Lake  (1995) and  Carmen (Matthew Bourne’s The Car Man,  2000 ). Designer Michael Levine has provided designs for ENO productions including  The Magic Flute ( 2012 ) Between Worlds ( 2015 ) and A Dog’s Heart (2010) .  Lighting design is by Robert Carsen and Peter van Praet.

A Midsummer Night’s Dream opens on Thursday 01 March at 7.30pm at the London Coliseum for 6 performances: 01, 08, 10, 14 and 15 March at 7.30pm and 04 March at 3pm.

Brighton Philharmonic Orchestra

On Sunday 11 February the Brighton Philharmonic Orchestra will be performing a concert of unashamedly romantic music to get everyone in the mood for Valentine’s Day, and we are delighted to welcome Howard Shelley back to Brighton as both conductor and pianist. (Regular audience members will recall that on his last visit to the Dome with the Brighton Phil two years ago, performing Shostakovich’s Piano Concerto No.2, he created quite a stir by directing the orchestra from the piano using a digital score on an iPad with a Bluetooth foot pedal.)
This time he opens proceedings with Schubert’s enchanting “Unfinished” Symphony No.8. Schubert started composing it in 1822 but put it aside to concentrate on other works, leaving it unfinished at his death six years later. We are left with two remarkable movements that herald the dawn of the Romantic symphony.
Mendelssohn wrote his First Piano Concerto aged just 21 on a trip to Italy (at the same time as composing his “Italian” Symphony) and its urgent, irrepressible opening seethes with the dynamism of impetuous youth. Franz Liszt famously played it at sight in a piano showroom, before going on to perform it many times in public to great acclaim. One of the great vehicles for the piano virtuoso, it is the perfect showcase for the dazzling technique that has made Howard Shelley one of the country’s truly great artists.

Our concert ends with Dvo?ák’s Symphony No.6 – full of rich melodies, lively rhythms and vivid orchestral colour, incorporating the folk music of his native Bohemia (now the Czech Republic) within a classical Romantic form. Premiered in 1881, this lush and confident work contributed greatly towards establishing him as one of the foremost composers of his generation, and provides a fitting conclusion for a programme that charts the evolution of the Romantic symphony.

Tickets (from £12-£38) are available from Brighton Dome Ticket Office in Church Road, in person, by telephone (01273) 709709, or online at: www.brightondome.org

50% discount for students and under 18s.

Discounted parking for BPO concert ticket-holders (just £6 between 1 & 6pm) is available at NCP Church Street Car Park.

 

ENO: Iolanthe

Arthur Sullivan  William Schwenck Gilbert                                                           
Conductor, Timothy Henty
Director, Cal McCrystal

 

Cal McCrystal directs a joyful new production of Gilbert and Sullivan’s hilarious satirical fantasy, Iolanthe.

Opens Tuesday 13 February at 7.30pm at the London Coliseum (14 performances)

Acclaimed comedy director Cal McCrystal – the mastermind behind some of the most celebrated comic scenes in theatre (One Man, Two Guvnors) and film (Paddington,Paddington 2, The Dictator and The World’s End) – makes his ENO debut with a new production of Iolanthe. Gilbert and Sullivan’s hilarious satire on British government, law and society features a stellar cast, including comedy legend Andrew Shore, who has performed some of ENO’s most memorable roles. ENO Harewood Artists Samantha Price sings in the title role and Barnaby Rea performs as Private Willis.

The first Gilbert and Sullivan opera that ENO performed in January 1962 (on the day on which the D’Oyly Carte monopoly ended) – Iolanthe is a brilliantly funny, satirical fantasy, revealing a typically Gilbert and Sullivan topsy-turvy worldview. Phyllis and Strephon wish to marry, but as she is a ward of court she requires the Lord Chancellor’s permission. He, however, wants her for himself. With madcap fairies in the Palace of Westminster and honourable members of The Lords in Arcadia, when Strephon turns out to be the son of The Lord Chancellor and the exiled fairy Iolanthe, all is cast into confusion. Iolanthe is a joyful show featuring flying fairies, quarrelsome lords, an ensemble of quirky characters and even stand-up comedy. This brand new production marries opera with theatre and comedy like never before.

Following the huge success of Mike Leigh’s The Pirates of Penzance (which broke ENO box office records upon its premiere in 2015) and the enduring popularity of Jonathan Miller’s The Mikado (a true audience favourite that has been revived 13 times in 28 years), ENO has become the foremost exponent of imaginative, witty stagings of these timeless British classics. Cal McCrystal’s new production ofIolanthe, with Gilbert and Sullivan expert Timothy Henty leading the ENO Orchestra, looks set to further bolster ENO’s reputation as the premier home for the works of this great comic pairing.

ENO’s international reputation for working with exciting directors from across a wide range of artistic disciplines has offered a fresh perspective and unique approach. Cal McCrystal is the latest artistic talent to apply his skills to the world of opera. Previous directors ENO has worked with include Mike Leigh, Terry Gilliam, Anthony Minghella, Rufus Norris, Carrie Cracknell and Fiona Shaw.

Brighton Philharmonic Orchestra

What better way is there to spend a chilly winter’s afternoon than by attending one of the Brighton Phil’s enjoyable Sunday afternoon concerts at Brighton Dome and being entertained and moved by wonderful music played by some very talented professional musicians. We are now half way through our current season (which runs from October to March) and thanks to a generous grant from the John Carewe Brighton Orchestra Trust, we are already planning our next season.

Over the next four concerts the orchestra will whisk Dome audiences away on a musical journey around the world and back and forth through the centuries with glorious music by the likes of Haydn, Mozart, Beethoven, Schubert, Mendelssohn, Dvorák, Tchaikovsky, Glinka, Mussorgsky, Sibelius, Malcolm Arnold, Delibes and Saint-Saëns as well as less well-known composers such as Alexander Arutunian, an Armenian whose fabulous Trumpet Concerto (which we perform on 4 March) is a real show-stopper.

­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­Our first concert of the New Year takes place on Sunday 28 January when we are joined by Michael Collins, one of the foremost clarinettists of his generation, as both conductor and soloist. Those of you with long memories may recall he won the woodwind prize in the very first Young Musician of the Year in 1978 at the tender age of 16.

The concert opens with one of Haydn’s London Symphonies, Symphony No.102, one of twelve symphonies written in 1794 on a visit to England. Rarely performed, it opens with stately grace and progresses to joyous vigour, and is regarded as one of his finest symphonies in both scope and scale.
Michael Collins is both soloist and conductor in Mozart’s Clarinet Concerto, a work of exquisite beauty that has become one of the most popular pieces in the repertoire. Completed just two months before Mozart’s death for his friend, the clarinettist Anton Stadler, its tender slow movement has featured in the soundtracks of films such as The King’s Speech and Out of Africa and often appears in the top 10 of Classic FM’s Hall of Fame.
Beethoven’s elegant and expansive Symphony No.1 which completes this concert is clearly influenced by the composer’s teachers, Haydn and Mozart. First performed in 1800 (in a concert he arranged himself) it impressed the Viennese public with Beethoven’s incredible talent. The form of the symphony pays homage to his teachers whilst at the same time pushing the boundaries of symphonic composition.

Tickets (from £12-£38) are available from Brighton Dome Ticket Office in Church Road, in person, by telephone (01273) 709709, or online at: www.brightondome.org

50% discount for students and under 18s.

 

 

Fantasia ! Spring 2018

45 Minutes of Music

The Meeting House at University of Sussex

A series of informal concerts by D’Arcy Trinkwon

Last Wednesday – every month @ 12 noon

January 31 February 28 March 21* April 25 May 30

FREE ADMISSION  everyone welcome

 

January 31
Fantasia & Fugue in F KREBS
Fantasia in G minor PACHELBEL
‘Echo’ Fantasia SWEELINCK
Fantasia: Nun komm’ der Heiden Heiland BRUHNS
Sonata quasi una Fantasia, Op.129 PEETERS
Fantaisie et fugue BOËLY

 

February 28
Fantasia & Fugue in C minor, BWV537 BACH
Fantasia in G, BWV571 Trio Sonata in D TELEMANN
Deux fantaisies ALAIN
Fantasia & Fugue on BACH LISZT

 

March 21
please note this is the penultimate Wednesday of March – not the last
Fantasia & Fugue in G minor, BWV542 BACH
Fantasia in C, BWV570 Echo Fantasia SWEELINCK
Fantasia in F minor & Major, K594 MOZART
Troisième Fantaisie, Op.157 SAINT-SAËNS
Fantasia on Mozart’s Turkish March WEINER