CDs June 2021

ALEXANDER ZEMLINSKY ANNIVERSARY EDITION
VARIOUS PERFORMERS
CAPRICCIO C7360 (6 CDs) 6’37

If, like me, you know little of Zemlinsky’s music this is an excellent introduction to his output. Orchestral music, songs with piano or orchestra and opera are all to be found here. It is clear that much of Zemlinsky’s work incorporated the voice, even in some of his large scale orchestral work such as the opening Lyric Symphony, Op18 for soprano, baritone and orchestra. A progression can be heard in later compositions which, whilst not embracing stark serialism certainly display an interest in adventurous harmony and less traditional tonality, for instance in the String Quartet No.2, Op 15. Purists might wish for more opera to be included here but I found the final CD of opera highlights to be an enjoyable listen in its own right and at the same time perhaps providing a sampler for those who would wish to experience fuller versions of the five works included here.

MOZART – SONATAS FOR VIOLIN & PIANO, K301, 304-5 & 454
PETER HANSON, violin
ANDREW ARTHUR, fortepiano
RESONUS RES10281 79’07

A fine period instrument recording of these sonatas which are each dedicated to women who supported Mozart in his musical endeavours. The duo of Peter Hanson and Andrew Arthur work very well together in the performances here.

NIKOS SKALKOTTAS – DANCE OF THE WAVES
ATHENS STATE ORCHESTRA, STEFANOS TSIALIS, conductor
NAXOS 8.574182 73’01

Described as “the most popular work of Greek art music today” Skalkottas’ 36 Greek Dances is a lovely work. Lasting just over 25 minutes these short dances combine in a lovely sequence that is often light and playful but with contrasts throughout. The disk also includes excerpts form the folk ballet The Sea and a premiere recording of the Suite No 1 for large orchestra, a work dating, in its final form, from 1935. Very enjoyable and probably unfamiliar repertoire for many listeners.

BRITISH LIGHT MUSIC 1 – RICHARD ADDINSELL
BBC CONCERT ORCHESTRA
PHILLIP MARTIN, RODERICK ELMS, piano
KENNETH ALWYN, conductor
NAXOS 8.555229 68’16

I have long had an affection for what has become known as British Light Music. Although Naxos have released a number of recordings of the genre already this appears to be the first in a new series of single composer CDs. Richard Addinsell was a prolific composer for films, radio and of standalone music. All are represented here including reconstructions and arrangements by various musicians where the original manuscripts have been lost. As with much of this music there are memorable melodies and beautiful orchestrations. The CD sets out to prove that there is more to Addinsell than just Warsaw Concerto. Shades of this are to be heard in the new-to-me theme from A Tale of Two Cities which ends the collection. A very welcome and enjoyable production.

ETHEL SMYTH – STRING QUARTET/STRING QUINTET
MANNHEIMER STREICHQUARTETT
CPO 999 352-2 68’29

This is a lovely pairing of the String Quartet in E minor with the String Quintet in E major. These two works were published 30 years apart and consequently show development in Smyth’s compositional approach. In these recordings this music of a pioneer and innovator who bridges the 19th and 20th Centuries sounds fresh and invigorating. It pushes forward whilst at the same time remains firmly in the tradition of English string writing, with wider European influences.

CARL PHILIPP EMANUEL BACH – THE SOLO KEYBOARD MUSIC VOL 40
KEYBOARD TRANSCRIPTIONS 1
MIKLOS SPANYI, harpsichord
BIS 2387 81’51

This monumental survey of the solo keyboard music of this son of JS reaches volume 40 with original keyboard transcriptions of orchestral works. Spirited performances from a performer who knows this repertoire very well include many shorter works alongside the Symphonies in E minor and D major and the Concerto in F major.

BRAHMS PIANO SONATAS & RHAPSODIES
GARRICK OHLSSON, piano
HYPERION CDA68334 69’11

The 2 Rhapsodies, Op 79 have long been favourites of mine. Sitting neatly between the longer Piano Sonatas No 1 & 2 and shorter works I find the way these pieces have room to develop without overstaying their welcome very appealing. Both have characteristic melodies and the way they play with rhythm and harmony bring out the best of Brahms’ pianistic writing. Lovely performances throughout by Garrick Ohlsson.

VOYAGE OF A SEA-GOD:
The Bassoon leading a musical journey through the 20th Century
LAURENCE PERKINS, bassoon
CITY OF BIRMINGHAM SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA
WILLIAM GOODCHILD, conductor. MICHAEL HANCOCK, piano
CARDUCCI STRING QUARTET
HYPERION CDA68371/2 (2 CDs) 144’21

Both the title and the concept drew me to this release. From an early age I was intrigued by the sound of the bassoon (Ivor the Engine?) both by its sound and, later on when a classmate was a player, by its looks! I am afraid to say that despite this I knew none of the music on this splendid double CD collection. A roll-call of prolific 20th Century composers each provide a single piece, together making a wonderful compilation of diverse music linked by this most magical timbre. Longer works such as Arnold Bax’ Threnody and Scherzo, Richard Rodney Bennett’s Bassoon Sonata, Andrzej Panufnik’s Concerto for bassoon & small orchestra and Elizabeth Maconchy’s Concertino for bassoon & string orchestra sit alongside shorter works including the brilliantly titled Minuet:Grace for a fresh egg written for a friend at the end of the 2nd World War by Herbert Howells. There was one composer I did not know, Richard Henry Walthew, whose Introduction & Allegro opens the whole set. Expertly played, Laurence Perkins’ solos enable different moods and atmospheres to be conveyed ably supported throughout by the other musicians. The booklet adds some interesting background to the music and this chronological progression.

KORNGOLD – SONGS -2
BRITTA STALLMEISTER, soprano SIBYLLE FISCHER, mezzo-soprano
UWE SCHENKER-PRIMUS, baritone KLAUS SIMON, piano
NAXOS 8.573083 57’55

This second volume includes quite a variety of settings. The more serious Drei Gesange fur mittlere Singstimme und Klavier, Op 18 ventures into the realms of more experimental harmony and form. This contrasts with some of the other songs which are in lighter style more reminiscent of Musical Theatre. A very good collection.

MUSIC FROM THE PROMISED LAND – DUO MANTAR
JACOB REUVEN, mandolin ADAM LEVIN, guitar
NAXOS 8.573962 73’02

This is a very enjoyable compilation of contemporary music from Israel for the less usual combination of mandolin and guitar. Pieces include Yehezkel Braun’s Sonata for Mandolin & Guitar (2004) and Paul Ben-Haim’s 3 songs without words (dating from 1952 and arranged more recently). Includes a number of premiere recordings.

VITEZSLAVA KAPRALOVA – WAVING FAREWELL
NICHOLAS PHAN, tenor AMY I-LIN CHENG, piano
UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN S O, KENNETH KIESLER, conductor
NAXOS 8.574144 58’57

It is a tragedy that Vitezslava Kapralova died so young. The music here is superb. Reaching only the age of 25 what more might she have gone on to achieve? The most substantial works here are Vojenska symfonieta (‘Military Sinfonietta’) and Piano Concerto in D minor, Op 7. Well worth investigating.

XIAOGANG YE – MOUNT E’MEI
WEI LU & DAN ZHU, violin SHENGNAN HU, percussion XIAOTANG TAN, piano
ROYAL SCOTTISH NATIONAL ORCHESTRA, GILBERT VARGA
DEUTSCHE STAATSPHILHARMONIE RHINELAND-PFALZ
STEFAN MALZEW & FRANK OLLU
NAXOS 8.579087 63’51

This very evocative music from one of China’s leading current composers makes for a very enjoyable listening experience. I am personally very drawn to the mixture of timbres , particularly the percussion. In the first and longest track from which the CD takes its name, also scored for violin and orchestra. Scent of Green Mango for piano and orchestra follows, together with Lamura Cuo for violin and orchestra and the string work The Silence of Mount Minshan. A very welcome addition to the Naxos range.

THE BEST OF ARNOLD – MALCOLM ARNOLD
VARIOUS ARTISTS
NAXOS 8.578360 76’30

Released to celebrate the centenary of Malcolm Arnold’s birth this collection is a very good introduction to his music with single movements from symphonies and concertos, the well-loved English Dances, Set 1 and the 3 Shanties and other shorter works. There is also a premiere recording of his Grand Fantasia from 1940. But to really be the ‘best’ doesn’t it need The Padstow Lifeboat?

SP

The Hastings Sinfonia

The Hastings Sinfonia will be celebrating 10 years of a very successful and uninterrupted existence next year. This exciting orchestra is well known for its strong commitment to the community as well as for its accessible concerts with popular music both old and new being performed.

The friendly orchestra, founded includes in its ranks both professional and good standard amateur players is now looking to include even more members to join them – as well as with guest soloists!

Having prepared well to avoid any risks caused by the covid pandemic, the Hastings Sinfonia is restarting rehearsals every Wednesday evenings at St John’s in Pevensey Road.

The Hastings Sinfonia was founded in 2012 by local composer Polo Piatti who remains as its Artistic Director and has been conducted for most of its existence by London maestro Derek Carden, who travels regularly to Hastings to hold rehearsals every week.

And there is some more exciting news! Due to the pandemic’s lockdown, the Sinfonia had to remain silent and unable to rehearse for over a year. Nevertheless, always inventive, the organisation has managed to create one very positive outcome from the situation. Lead by David Bottom, one of their clarinettists, they have formed a brand new, associated ensemble, the ‘Hastings Sinfonia Wind Quintet’. The new group has started rehearsing together on zoom and then together as soon as Covid rules have permitted. Members of the new and very promising ensemble are Annabel Noton (flute), Gail Taylor (oboe), Adam Rawlinson (bassoon) and Tim Egan (French horn). Their first public performance will take place on Sunday 22nd August at 2pm at the bandstand in Hastings’s Alexandra Park. Why not come along, listen to beautiful music and meet the musicians!?

If you are interested in joining the very welcoming Hastings Sinfonia Orchestra please email its chair Sandra Goodsell on: [email protected]

Faiths in Tune World Music Day 20/21st June

Celebrate World Music Day 2021. Experience music and dance by artists and groups from 13 different faith backgrounds and more than 15 different countries at this global online live concert event!

Faiths In Tune is the largest interfaith music initiative in Europe, reaching over 20,000 people of over 20 different faiths every year with its Interfaith Music Festivals and events in the UK, Germany, Italy and beyond. It promotes respect and dialogue through music and personal encounters that can be experienced in the safe spaces of the festivals.

www.faithsintune.org

Make Music Day on Monday 21 June Brighton Dome

Monday 21 June sees the return of Make Music Day; a worldwide celebration of music in person, online and beyond. Brighton & Hove Music & Arts (BHMA) and East Sussex Music (ESM) will be celebrating in style with an all-day virtual event that everyone can be a part of.

Giving music-makers a platform to showcase their work, BHMA and ESM are inviting everyone, from beginner to expert, to submit videos of their own performances, which will be shared on social media throughout the day, as well as showcasing videos from their talented teachers, learners and more. On top of this, there will be competitions and giveaways, live streams with free teachings and performances, messages from special guests and awards for the best performers, all to be announced soon.

To submit your videos, visit bit.ly/MusicDayForm and to stay up to date with announcements, join the official Facebook event page at bit.ly/MusicDayEventFB.

Make Music Day began in France as Fête de la Musique in 1982 when the Ministry of Culture imagined a great popular event that would allow all musicians to express themselves and make themselves known. This worldwide phenomenon first came to the UK in 2012 and the number of gigs taking place has been growing year on year. 2017 was the first UK-wide coordinated event with support and funding from national organisations resulting in 147 performances. In 2020, there were 1,739 performances live and online and it’s still growing. This is an opportunity to get involved in the world’s largest grassroots music movement – it’s a wonderful way to celebrate the longest day of the year.

The Royal Opera House announces full details of the 2021/22 Season

ROH logo.jpg

The Royal Opera House today confirms details for its 2021/22 Season, the first full Season since 2019. Opening on Monday 13 September, the Season includes five world premieres from The Royal Ballet and The Royal Opera, classic revivals and an exciting roster of international and UK talent performing across the two stages of the Royal Opera House.

In its 90th anniversary year, The Royal Ballet presents a Season that respects the past and heralds the future. Three world premieres, including Wayne McGregor’s The Dante Project, Christopher Wheeldon’s Like Water for Chocolate and a new work by American choreographer Kyle Abraham, are performed alongside much-loved 19th-century classics and heritage ballets by Frederick Ashton and Kenneth MacMillan. The Linbury Theatre hosts a raft of partnerships and co-productions including with Ballet Black, Alessandra Ferri, Yorke Dance Project and a world premiere from Company Wayne McGregor. Creative opportunities for emerging talent will also feature with Draft Works and the Next Generation Festival. The Season culminates in July 2022 with The Royal Ballet making a welcome return to international touring with a three-week tour of Japan where the Company will perform Kenneth MacMillan’s Manon and Peter Wright’s Giselle.

The Royal Opera Season will open with a new production of Verdi’s Rigoletto, directed by Oliver Mears – his first production since becoming The Royal Opera’s Director of Opera in 2017. This new production will receive its premiere in September 2021, with Royal Opera Music Director Antonio Pappano conducting the Orchestra of the Royal Opera House. In its 75th year, The Royal Opera strengthens its commitment to the works of Benjamin Britten, George Frideric Handel and Leoš Janá?ek with new productions of Peter Grimes, Theodora and the long-awaited premiere of Jen?fa. Also given its premiere this Season is a new production of Camille Saint-Saëns’s grand-opera Samson et Dalila, while international and British talent are cast in repertory favourites including Tosca, La traviata and Così fan tutte.

The Linbury Theatre presents two opera world premieres: Laura Bowler’s The Blue Woman, directed by Katie Mitchell, and Wolf Witch Giant Fairy – a magical new family show in collaboration with Little Bulb opening in time for Christmas. Spring 2022 will see director Adele Thomas bring Vivaldi’s Bajazet to life in a new production – the first Vivaldi opera to be staged at the Royal Opera House. In June 2022 Tom Coult’s Violet will be presented off site at the Hackney Empire with co-producers Music Theatre Wales and Britten Pears Arts.

CDs May 2021 (2)

I WILL BUILD YOU A HOUSE
ANDREAS IHLEBAEK, piano
NXN 1004 50’ approx

An enjoyably relaxing sequence of melodic, expansive piano music from this contemporary Norwegian pianist/composer. Grouped into 3 sections, Come Summer, Preludes to Storm and Let me be Good, the music is at times gently hypnotic, with hints of Satie and contemporary film soundtracks. There is a lovely purity to this music. An interesting biographical note gives a hint at how these composition/performance pieces have helped him and others, especially as much of the music came about during the Covid pandemic.

OTTORINO RESPIGHI – WORKS FOR FLUTE & ORCHESTRA
ROBERTO FABBRICIANI, flute
ORCHESTRA SINFONICA ABRUZZESE, NICOLA PASZKOWSKI, conductor
TACTUS TC 871805 50’48

This collection of late romantic works includes two premiere recordings. The CD is bookended with two Suites with the two-movement Melodia & Valse Caressante and Serenata in between. Developments in his compositional style can be seen in the chronological progression from the earlier works here (early 20th Century) up to the final suite Gli Ucelli. As well as various influences from his native Italy, including baroque stylings, Gregorian chant and polyphony he was influenced by Russia and other European cultures.

MAX BRUCH PIANO WORKS
CHRISTOF KEYMER, piano
CPO 555 258-2 66’43

This collection of short descriptive pieces mostly arranged into themed collections shows a different side to the composer associated mostly with larger works for solo strings and orchestra. Bruch was an excellent pianist but did not regard his piano writing as particularly significant. He was drawn to folk melodies of many different sources. Two sets of Swedish Dances make up a sizeable portion of this CD. They can be seen in the same light as other national dances by Brahms and Dvorak. An interesting collection with amterial that will be unfamiliar to many.

RACHMANINOV – PIANO SONATA NO 2, PRELUDES OP 23 NOS 4-6, MOMENTS MUSICAUX
SONYA BACH, piano
RUBICON RCD1058 68’18

This is a lovely disc of Rachmaninov’s music. With sensitive and passionate performances throughout Sonya Bach is obviously very at home with this repertoire. Recommended!

EDUARD FRANCK – PIANO CONCERTOS 1 & 2
GEORG MICHAEL GRAU, piano
WURTTEMBERGISCHE PHILHARMONIE REUTLINGEN
FAWZI HAIMOR, conductor
CPO 555 320-2 74’57

These two piano concertos, in D minor and C major, date from the middle and latter half of the 19th Century. These romantic pieces were in part influenced by associations with Mendelssohn, Schumann and Sterndale Bennett. These performances give a very good introduction to the works of this particular Franck, if, like me you were unfamiliar with him and is enjoyable in its own right.

NORDIC RHAPSODY
JOHAN DALENE, violin
CHRISTIAN IHLE HADLAND, piano
BIS-2560

Produced in conjunction with Radio 3’s New Generation Artists scheme this is a lovely programme of music highlighting composers from the region. Although many of the composers are well known the music is not necessarily familiar. Music includes Nielsen’s Romance in D major, Grieg’s Violin Sonata No 1 in F major, as well as pieces by Sinding, Stenhammar, Sibelius and Rautavaara’s Notturno e danza.

SCOTT WOLLSCHLEGER – DARK DAYS
KARL LARSON, piano
NEW FOCUS RECORDINGS FCR287 ’50 approx

This is a very rewarding disc of short contemporary pieces which play with colour, rhythm and harmony. Written between 2007 and 2020 this collection shows how the composer combines these elements together with the properties of the piano alongside his personal experience of synaesthesia. The music is expansive, often repetitive but with slight shifts and variations. The long term collaboration of composer and performer also adds to the overall effectiveness. I hope to hear more.

ROBERT GROSLOT – THE INTIMACY OF DISTANCE
CHARLOTTE WAJNBERG, soprano
BRUSSELS PHILHARMONIC, ROBERT GROSLOT, conductor
NAXOS 8.579100 55’45

Described as a “concerto for soprano and orchestra” The Intimacy of Distance sets a recent text concerned with life and distance. Alongside this are My Green Shade Forest and Trittico incantevole. The CD consists entirely of music written within the last six years and premiere recordings. A welcome addition to the catalogue of contemporary music.

WIDOR – ORGAN SYMPHONIES 5
CHRISTIAN VON BLOHN, organ of St Josef’s Church, Sankt Ingbert, Germany
NAXOS 8.574279 76’26

The Naxos survey of Widor’s organ works continues with volume 5 of the Organ Symphonies, the 3rd volume in the series recorded by organist Christian von Blohn. Interesting booklet notes highlight the fact that these works exist in different versions, necessitating decision making as to which version to record. This is again referenced by the inclusion between Symphony No 5 in F minor (which includes the famous Toccata) and Symphony No 6 in G minor of movement 4 of Symphony No 8 in B major, which was included in the 1887 edition but omitted later in 1901. Fine performances of substantial music.

JOHANN SIMON MAYR – MESSA DI GLORIA IN E MINOR & F MINOR
SIMON MAYR CHORUS
CONCERTO DE BASSUS, FRANZ HAUK, conductor
NAXOS 8.574203 80’09

World premiere recordings here of two different approaches to setting the mass. The first, lasting nearly an hour is on a much grander scale to the second which comes in at just over twenty minutes. The first incorporates intricate musical devices and showcases the development of Mayr’s (1763-1845) later writing. The pairing gives an opportunity to compare a single composer’s response with vastly differing outcomes from the same starting point. This music was once to be heard across Europe as a development of the traditional Italian school of composition. I am sure this CD will re-introduce his name to many.

SP

Two Sisters Gypsy Music People’s String Foundation Hever Castle, 29 May 2021

Anyone who reads my music reviews regularly will spot that this concert is not the sort of thing I usually cover. Actually, it’s back to my roots: my father was a ceilidh band leader and from my early teens I often sat in on fiddle or guitar when they were short for a dance, festival or other event. I therefore feel pretty comfortable with anything folky and sometimes it even overlaps with the early, baroque, classical and Romantic music I usually favour.

And this concert – where we sat under an awning, and well wrapped up in Hever Castle’s idyllic grounds as part of its festival – did not disappoint. I was pleasantly surprised by the eclecticism and the creativity of a whole evening of original compositions.

Ben Sutcliffe (violin, vocals and keyboard) and Zaid Al Rikabi (guitar and vocals), who are based in Cornwall, have been composing songs together since 2008. Gradually they began to work with other players and from that has emerged the 32 piece orchestra which they call The People’s String Foundation – although some woodwind and brass players are included. As a group they have worked on various projects and collaborations and Sutcliffe and Al Rikabi are regular composers for the Minnack Theatre.

This concert – their first live gig for nearly a year, they told the audience – gave us Sutcliffe and Al Rikabi playing acoustically in the first half. Then, after the interval, we got an audio/video projection of the whole orchestra recorded in Truro last year with the two men silhouetted in front of it and playing as part of the ensemble.

The music is very repetitive but compelling and often beautiful. The opening number, for example, consists of a fairly simple 16 bar melody which repeats to become, effectively, a folk-style take on theme and variations with a pretty exciting foot-tapping accelerando and crescendo passage. The whole concert is characterised by minor keys, close harmony and syncopation. Romanian Gypsy and Klezmer influences are very clear. I especially liked the col legno effect with very percussive guitar in, for example a number called “Solidarity” Both men are virtuoso players and several times stunned me with their techniques – Sutcliffe’s upward glissandi are really something.

My problem with the first half was the lighting. There wasn’t any. The temporary theatre in the Hever Castle grounds is effectively an awning for the audience and a forward-pointing canopy over the stage so it’s in shadow. It is equipped with stage lights and there’s a lighting box at the back of the auditorium but none of it was in use for this show. Whether that was for artistic or budgetary reasons it was a mistake because I could hardly see the two men on stage.

The second half was visually better because dusk had arrived and the main focus was the lit screen behind the two men. The production, called Res Publica, was a collaboration with Kneehigh, a Cornish theatre company and we saw a wooden marionette climb out of an old wooden violin case in a wood and then explore – as we listened to and watched the orchestra which makes rather a good sound. I was interested to see that, although Sutcliffe and Al Rikabi play entirely from memory with a great deal of visual signalling, orchestra members use conventional sheet music.

It was certainly a concert with a difference and an enjoyable two hours in a very pleasant venue.

Susan Elkin

HASTINGS INTERNATIONAL PIANO – Claire Martin OBE and Nikki Iles – 28th May – Rye Creative Centre

Alongside the well established Concerto Competition Hastings International Piano organises a variety of events throughout the year to promote the piano in different settings with a number of prestigious performers. In this concert of songs in jazz arrangements the pianist had an equal billing with the singer. She had two roles – providing accompaniment and, as with much jazz, sometimes taking the lead and becoming the soloist for a while.

Both performers are acclaimed musicians in their own right. Claire Martin led us through a well constructed tribute of songs mostly associated with Tony Bennett and Bill Evans. Brilliantly accompanied at the piano throughout by Nikki Iles the programme included songs from Rodgers and Hammerstein, Bernstein & Gershwin.

Claire Martin’s voice sometimes declaimed with great force and at other times teased and whispered. At times there was humour and playfulness and at other times a broader straighter sound. In a similar way Nikki Isles sometimes gently supported and at other times extended and highlighted melodies, with adventurous harmony and rhythmic dexterity.

The venue for this concert was new. The recently renovated old gym now forms a versatile auditorium for performance at the heart of Rye Creative Centre. Much thought had gone into making the audience welcome and comfortable as well as necessarily socially distanced. It is encouraging that at a time when performers and audiences have been severely restricted this new venue has been developed so successfully.

A very enjoyable evening.

Further events will take place here as well as at Fairlight Hall and White Rock Theatre.

hastingsinternationalpiano.org

Stephen Page

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The Hastings Sinfonia will be celebrating 10 years of a very successful and uninterrupted existence next year. This exciting orchestra is well known for its strong commitment to the community as well as for its accessible concerts with popular music both old and new being performed.

The friendly orchestra, which is formed by both professional and good standard amateur players, with many guest soloists is now looking to include even more members to join them!

Having prepared well to avoid any risks caused by the covid pandemic, the Hastings Sinfonia is ready to restart rehearsals Wednesday evenings at St John’s in Pevensey Road very soon.

The Sinfonia was founded in 2012 by local composer Polo Piatti who remains as its Artistic Director and has been conducted for most of the time since by London maestro Derek Carden, who travels regularly to Hastings from London to hold rehearsals every week.

And there is some more exciting news! Due to the pandemic’s lockdown, the Sinfonia had to remain silent and unable to rehearse for over a year. Nevertheless, always inventive, the organisation has managed to create one very positive outcome from the situation. Lead by David Bottom, one of their clarinettists, they have formed a brand new, associated ensemble, the ‘Hastings Sinfonia Wind Quintet’.  They started playing together on zoom and then together when Covid rules permitted. Other members of the new ensemble are Annabel Noton (flute), Gail Taylor (oboe), Adam Rawlinson (bassoon) and Tim Egan (French horn). Their first public performance will take place on Sunday 22nd August at 2pm at the bandstand in Hastings’s Alexandra Park.

Come along and meet some of the musicians.

If interested in joining this wonderful orchestra please email its chair Sandra Goodsell on: [email protected]